How's this look

Diffs, axles, lockers, transmissions, portals, that kind of thing.
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Karlosfandango
Great Britain
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2018 4:27 am

How's this look

Post by Karlosfandango » Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:49 am

Hello all. I'm currently in the process of finding myself a Pinz. I originally was set on a 710 but have found a 712 that might be an option. There's also a 406 unimog that's clouding the issue but we'll gloss over that.

I'm in the UK so the availability of any version Pinz is slim to say the least. The particular one that I'm planning on viewing will need a bit or work tidying it up and sorting the carbs which I'm more than willing to do.

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I have some pictures of the underneath that i'd appreciate opinions of. Obviously viewing in person is great but to have a heads up from those of you with far more experience and knowledge of what to look for would be invaluable.

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Other than a knackered axle boot on the front left is there anything to be aware of? All the fluids have just been changed apparently so that explains the wet looking areas on portals etc. I like the fact it isn't covered in Waxoyl hiding any problems.

Thanks in advance :D

63rover
Canada
Posts: 237
Joined: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:18 pm
Location: Mt. Hope, Ont., Canada

Re: How's this look

Post by 63rover » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:19 am

Looks nice! Keep in mind, any Pinzgauer (like any older Land Rover or Jag) is not transportation but a hobby. Mine has been very good for 5 years but also has regular preventive maintenance.

The weeping of some of the drive-line seams will need to be watched to make certain it doesn't become a leak. Unless you witnessed the fluid changes or have a professional invoice showing the fluids used I would recommend changing them again so you know what is used.

The 712 vs 710 boils down to 4 points in my opinion. 1. A 712 is marginally slower. (not significantly) 2. The 712 is longer so tight spots on trails may require some back and forth. 3. The 712's extra axle, and shorter 1-2 axle wheelbase allows for better obstacle crossing ability and climbing ability also. 4. A 712 has better weight balance with the extra axle. (710s are light in the rear)

BTY Haflingertechnique in Scotland should become your favourite shop.

Karlosfandango
Great Britain
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2018 4:27 am

Re: How's this look

Post by Karlosfandango » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:42 am

It's only ever going to be for fun so i'm definitely prepared for its quirks. The maintenance and 'tinkering' is also something that I'd really look forward to. I just don't want to go in blind having no previous experience other than passenger rides in the past. Parts are a concern but it is useful to have Haflingertechnique available even if it is the complete other end of the country.

63rover
Canada
Posts: 237
Joined: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:18 pm
Location: Mt. Hope, Ont., Canada

Re: How's this look

Post by 63rover » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:24 pm

It's closer to you than to my side of the pond! :lol: You also have the advantage of having more shops about who are familiar with multiple carb setups.

Irregardless of 710 or 712 a copy of the shop manual and parts book will be invaluable.

The best advice to keep in mind is a line I found in my old Aro 243 manual which stated that if something goes wrong it is likely to be a simple problem. Check those first.

In comparison to a Unimog, which a friend has, the Pinzgauer is smaller and more nimble. The Mog seldom has the advantage. The Pinzgauer leaves friends with Jeeps and Land Rovers asking where they can get one.

The only caution I have is beware of the fact that the Pinzgauer has independent front suspension. This can cause issues on side slopes and anywhere else where the downhill axle can come off the ground, swing under and come down on the outer edge of the tire. This is the equivalent of coming down on your ankle. You will likely go over, so will the Pinzgauer. Be sure to drive the downhill wheel and keep it in contact. You will be fine. It is a little counter-intuitive, especially if you are used to a front beam axle. There are some who don't get this and laughingly call it a right of passage when physics catches up with them. I prefer understanding how to drive the beast safely and not damage it nor me.

All the best.

Clive

undysworld
Posts: 1775
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2004 8:08 am
Location: Blue Mounds, WI

Re: How's this look

Post by undysworld » Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:25 am

The backing plate on the center left wheel shows signs of a weep, the fluid looks like it's even run down onto the tire. I'd guess it's the seal in the wheel drive, so not a real big issue. Keeping an eye on the fluid level there would be wise, but you might want to address it to make sure the fluid doesn't get onto the shoes and ruin them. There is a weep hole in the backing plate to (hopefully) prevent the contamination of the shoes, but...

Besides that, I didn't see anything that looked like a problem. But then, I'm normally not the most perceptive guy around. So hopefully wiser eyes than mine will chime in.
It is better to go skiing and think of God, than go to church and think of sport. Fridjof Nansen
I hope to die in my ski boots... ...just not today. Me

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Buzz
United States of America
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 5:33 pm
Location: St. Louis, Mo.

Re: How's this look

Post by Buzz » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:40 pm

I agree with the other posts here. I would like to see some pictures of the engine as well. From here I would check the operation of the starter - some can fail to mesh every few attempts. Then I would check shifting/ clutch operation and braking. Lastly, I would check operation of the lockers and of course how the engine sounds and pulls. Remember the engine is air cooled and will be noisier than a liquid cooled one. - Buzz
"It's as stupid and wonderful as owning a pet elephant."

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